Protected: Community Blog: The Freedom of Shabbat

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

Protected: Atelier 3-27-2015: Earth: Narkisim Observations and Explorations

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

Protected: 3/26/15 B’roshim “G-d is in All the Parts of the Torah” – Eliana

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

Protected: T’marim 3-26-15: Flashlight Exploration

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

Protected: T’zivonim 3/26/15: Hanging Window Garden Preparation

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

Protected: Alonim 3.26.2015: We are The Storytellers

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

Arazim 3/26/15: Drawing Freedom

Passover is, in part, a time of asking questions. Two questions guided our Pesach (Passover) discussion this morning: How would it make you feel to be a slave? How would it make you feel to be free?

Izzy came up with two words:“sad” and “freedom”, which she asked me to help her spell.  I asked her, in turn, how she could draw how these words felt. We thumbed through a beautiful Haggadah  for inspiration.  She chose a picture which showed  a person with one body but two torsos. She noticed that in one torso, the figure’s hand were bound and they were down. The other figure’s hands were up.

IMG_7856

I watched, fascinated, as she proceeded to draw two pictures, which she IMG_7851described as two worlds. In one world, Isabelle said, the girl was happy. “Her world has lots and lots of trees  and she doesn’t have to work. the sun gives her lots and lots of light and helps her trees grow. She climbed a ladder and got a tasty orange”.

Isabelle continued with her story. “Her friend got caught as a slave. She was running  for freedom and the guards caught her. She feels sad. In her world, she had bricks in her hand and she had to work, work, work and she couldn’t have freedom. She built pyramids. But God saw this and didn’t want it. So God said to Pharaoh,”LET MY PEOPLE GO!”. So she  put down her brick to make a birthday cake for her friend.”

Curious to see how another child would react to the same  artistic provocation, I watched as Eliana reacted to the original artwork from the Haggadah. ” I like it”, she said. “It has yellow and pink and those (pointing to the Hebrew words).

I see it has two sets of hands . the hands are clapping. This one (hands up) is clapping and those (hands down) are clapping down. I want to draw now. ” She began to draw, and the narration continued. “They are clapping because the Jewish people are free. Maybe that guy (in chains) has handcuffs.

Eliana proceeds to draw the picture from the Haggadah. She chooses green and yellow, then says, “Black for the Hebrew letters.” I ask her, “How do you know those are Hebrew letters?’ She responds, “Because my Dad speaks Hebrew and my Grandpa speaks Hebrew and he speaks it to me.”IMG_7853

Both Isabelle and Eliana, by relating  connections between themselves and the Israelites  of long ago, are following a Passover tradition that in each generation, one is obligated to feel as if he or she has gone out of Mitzraym, Egypt. The story continues, from generation to generation!